Prof. Gerard ′t Hooft

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    Institute for Theoretical Physics Universiteit Utrecht

    Curator and author

    Gerard ′t Hooft, Institute for Theoretical Physics Universiteit Utrecht

    Featured Author: Gerard 't Hooft

    THooftPhoto.jpg

    Gerard 't Hooft (b. 5 July 1946) was born in Den Helder, The Netherlands. He majored in Physics and Mathematics at Utrecht University, graduating in 1969. He received his PhD in 1972, with his thesis titled "Renormalization Procedure for Yang-Mills fields". He was soon given a two-year fellowship at CERN in Geneva, and subsequently appointed to a professorship at Utrecht University in 1974, where he is currently.

    In 1999 Dr. 't Hooft was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics", work he did with his PhD advisor M. Veltman. Dr. 't Hooft is a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences (1984) and a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1986). He is a member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences (1982), a Fellow of the British Institute of Physics (2000), and an Associé étranger of the French Académie des Sciences (1995). 't Hooft has received numerous other awards, including the 1982 Wolf Prize and the 1986 Lorentz Medal.

    With Dr. Veltman, Dr. 't Hooft developed gauge theories. It has been shown that a number of successful field theories are gauge theories, including quantum electrodynamics and the standard model. Additionally, 't Hooft is interested in what can be inferred about quantum gravity through the study of black holes.

    For more information, visit http://www.phys.uu.nl/~thooft/

    Scholarpedia articles:

    Gauge theories. Scholarpedia, 3(12):7443 (2009).

    Photo by Ivar Pel, 2005
    (Author profile by Leo Trottier)
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